Can OBJ, Atiku’s CUPP serve Nigeria a hot cup of coffee?

In Nigeria, alliance politics is a historical staple. In the 1960s, the NCNC and NPC forged an alliance to stabilise the newly independent country.  But the marriage segued from harmony to divorce.

The skirmishes among the political parties – NCNC, NPC and AG – heightened the political temperature of the country to a frightening degree, and eventually the military struck in 1966.

In 1979 (Second Republic), NPN (Shehu Shagari’s party) entered into a relationship of “convenient necessity” with NPP (Nnamdi Azikiwe’s party). The reason for the entente was so that the executive could get bills passed by the national assembly, where there was vicious opposition.

But corruption brought an end to the union. In 1981, members of both parties went for each other’s throats over access to government’s largesse. The military struck two years later.

In 2013, AD, CPC, ANPP and ‘nPDP’ emulsified into APC.  But a few years after the marriage, the party cannot keep its broomsticks together. The marriage was one of convenience; simply contracted for the sake of taking over power.

Now, it is obvious that the APC polygamous marriage was just for political expediency and not for delivering quality governance to Nigerians.

But we are back to where we were in 2013 with a new union of kindred political parties – Coalition of United Political Parties (CUPP).

I will not write off the coalition yet because Nigeria deserves good governance and a better alternative at this point. The country is in an intensive care unit and needs urgent surgery.

But my only issue with the coalition is that it is an erratic response to a pungent malady. Obviously, the throbbing aim of the coalition is to take over power from the APC. No programme, plan or agenda of how to deliver good governance to Nigerians.

After taking over power what next? Are we going to return to an era of excuses and arrogant incompetence? And of ‘we are not performing because APC wasted four years?’

Nigeria needs a doctor. But we should not in a hurry take this patient to a Babalawo.

Again, I will not write off the coalition just yet, but I hope the 32 parties in the alliance will begin to show singularity in the agenda of how they will rescue Nigeria.

I hope CUPP, if it succeeds, will serve Nigeria the needed cup of elixir.

I hope.

Fredrick is a media personality.

He can be reached on Twitter: @FredrickNwabufo, Facebook: Fredrick Nwabufo